Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

Articles | Popular | Future

INTERVIEWS

The Baylor Project: A Brand New Day

Read "The Baylor Project: A Brand New Day" reviewed by K. Shackelford

Marcus Baylor's coalescence of various American music styles into his playing has already secured him a spot in the history of post-modern jazz drummers. In the book, The Jazz Book: From Ragtime to the 21st Century (Chicago Review Press, 2009), authors Joachim-Ernst Berendt and Günther Huesmann cite Baylor as one of an exclusive list of drummers that shaped jazz drumming in the nineties through inventive polyrhythms and genre syncretism in their techniques. Baylor's affinity for the drums started ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Spring Quartet at Dalton Recital Hall

Read "Spring Quartet at Dalton Recital Hall" reviewed by John Ephland

Spring Quartet Dalton Recital Hall, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI May 4, 2019 They had to add chairs. The 435-seat Dalton Recital Hall, on the campus of Western Michigan University, was filled with multiple generations of music fans from all walks of life. The alluring ticket, brought to town by Fontana Chamber Arts, was the Spring Quartet in their final concert of a coast-to-coast tour.In fact, it had been five years since ...

MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Three releases on Iluso Records

Read "Three releases on Iluso Records" reviewed by John Eyles

Iluso Records was formed in 2013 by the Australian drummer Mike Caratti and the Madrid-born, New York-based guitarist Alvaro Domene, the two having met and become close friends in 2007 when they were both studying on the jazz course at Middlesex University, London, and maintained contact after they left London in 2011. They initially formed the label to release a CD by Gran Masa, a quartet which they had put together with two Spanish musicians. In its early days, Iluso ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Michael Ragonese: Day to Day

Read "Day to Day" reviewed by Paul Naser

If you haven't heard Michael Ragonese's name before, you're sure to hear it a lot more. The award winning pianist is a constant fixture in Los Angeles; if he's not a sideman at one club, he's leading a band at another. Among the many luminaries he has performed or recorded with are: Bennie Maupin, David Binney, Engelbert Humperdinck, Alphonso Johnson and Dave Koz, whose newest album will feature Ragonese. His busy performance schedule hasn't kept him from writing and perfecting ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Pamela Polland: Pamela Polland / Have You Heard The One About The Gas Station Attendant?

Read "Pamela Polland / Have You Heard The One About The Gas Station Attendant?" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

The singer-songwriter movement of the seventies paved the way for several new voices in popular music, but not everyone got the success of Carole King, whose album Tapestry (Ode, 1971) marked a peak in the movement, commercially and artistically. Pamela Polland was one of the artists whom fame eluded. Polland was poised for a big breakthrough with a record contract for CBS and the staunch support of label president, Clive Davis. However, things didn't turn out as planned. ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Maureen Choi: Theia

Read "Theia" reviewed by Jim Worsley

Maureen Choi's classical training and leanings are at the forefront and provide a substantial foundation. The palette is then wide open to incorporate jazz, flamenco, and fandango. Theia has a distinctive array of colors and has profoundly compelling undertones. Each song is its own unique journey with unknown passages, trap doors, and idiosyncratic paths leading to seamless tempo changes and unrestrained exploration. Theia opens with its most spacious and exhilarating piece. Choi's epic composition “Phoenix Borealis" traverses ...

RADIO

Phronesis Live at BIMHUIS Amsterdam

Read "Phronesis Live at BIMHUIS Amsterdam" reviewed by BIMHUIS

This energetic formation from London gives a futuristic twist to the jazz formula of piano, bass and drums. 'A killer live band' (The Guardian). Everything and everyone in the universe is interconnected: this is what Phronesis want to communicate with the album We Are All, the current highlight of their oeuvre according to de Volkskrant. The threesome from London became a big name at (jazz) festivals thanks to their exciting ensemble playing, sometimes close-knit and sometimes disorienting, but ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Mark Dresser: Ain't Nothing But a Cyber Coup & You

Read "Ain't Nothing But a Cyber Coup & You" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Bassist Mark Dresser played on saxophonist Joe Lovano's Flights Of Fancy: Trio Fascination, Edition 2 (Blue Note, 2001), and he sat in with soprano saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom on her Like Silver, Like Song (Artist Share, 2005) and Chasing Paint (Arabesque, 2002); and he and drummer Jim Black filled in as trio mates on pianist Satoko Fujii's trio of superb recordings, Junction (2001), Illusion Suite (2003) and Trace A River (2006), all on Libra Records. This gives you an idea ...

INTERVIEWS

André Ménard: 40 Years at the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal

Read "André Ménard: 40 Years at the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

André Ménard is the co-founder and Artistic Director of the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal. Ranked as the world's largest jazz festival in the Guinness World Records, the festival celebrates its 40th anniversary with the 2019 edition. Ménard has announced his retirement this year, marking it as a personal milestone as well. A legendary concert promoter, he is a passionate music fan above all. Our conversation ranged from the beginning of the festival to the present, covering memorable performances ...

CHOICE CUTS

Chet Baker I'll Remember April, Zoot Sims Over the Rainbow, and Lorez Alexandria This Could Be the Start of Something Big

Read "Chet Baker I'll Remember April, Zoot Sims Over the Rainbow, and Lorez Alexandria This Could Be the Start of Something Big" reviewed by Mark Barnett

Choice Cuts is an offshoot of Getting Into Jazz. Your butcher notwithstanding, we're defining a “Choice Cut" as an outstanding track from an otherwise unremarkable CD (or vinyl record); a track so good it justifies adding the disc to your collection. Here are a trio to start with... Chet Baker, “I'll Remember April" (From the album Chet Baker in Paris, Verve Records 1956) Given the ups and downs of Baker's career, it's easy to forget ...

INTERVIEWS

Moers Festival Interviews: Scatter The Atoms That Remain

Read "Moers Festival Interviews: Scatter The Atoms That Remain" reviewed by Martin Longley

Scatter The Atoms That Remain are set to be quite possibly the most jazzed combo at this year's Moers Festival, in Germany, but this simply illustrates the high degree of unfaithfulness displayed by many of its attending artists towards the jazz tradition. There are a mass of Moersfest acts who possess some sort of jazz-rootedness, but many of them also have other fingers deep inside rock, electronic, global-ethnic, hip-hop, or moderne composition. Not that Moers calls itself a jazz festival ...

RADIO

20 Years of One Man’s Jazz

Read "20 Years of One Man’s Jazz" reviewed by Maurice Hogue

This show marks the 20th anniversary of One Man's Jazz which began its radio journey on May 1, 1999 at CKUW 95.9 FM in Winnipeg, eventually shifting to extraterrestrial Taint Radio in 2012. Rather than just play something from my favourite recording list for each of those twenty years (that was too easy), I decided to head for the playlists and just pluck out one track from all the tunes played in each year, starting with 1999's Peter Epstein and ...