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Ted Rosenthal: Dear Erich, A Jazz Opera

Ken Dryden By

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With Brookmeyer, additionally, the content of the Jazz Composer's Workshop had a lot to do with thinking about ways of expanding jazz composition, in terms of longer forms and other influences. For him specifically, some European influences were captivating him and he was imparting that to we students. —Ted Rosenthal
Ted Rosenthal is one of the most renowned pianists of his generation. He won first prize at the second Thelonious Monk International Jazz Piano Competition and has been awarded several NEA grants as a composer. Well known as the pianist in Gerry Mulligan's final quartet, Rosenthal has recorded or performed with many other artists, including Bob Brookmeyer, Phil Woods, Art Farmer, Jim Hall, Jon Faddis, Benny Golson, James Moody, Mel Lewis, Lee Konitz and Ken Peplowski. Rosenthal has recorded fifteen CDs as a leader for a variety of labels. In addition to performing and composing, Rosenthal has been very active in jazz education.

All About Jazz: Tell me about your classical and jazz studies.

Ted Rosenthal: I studied jazz privately with a variety of people: just a few lessons with Lennie Tristano, about a year of piano lessons with Jaki Byard. My first piano teacher, Tony Aless, was a very fine jazz pianist who did a lot of studio work and is on some Charlie Parker with Strings [albums]. The jazz I studied was predominately from about the age of twelve to eighteen, some of the summer workshops, Jamey Aebersold, some master classes with Billy Taylor. I was also studying classical at the same time as there were limited opportunities to study jazz, like being a jazz major in college, so I did a little of bit of cramming, you could call it, to get my classical chops up to snuff to go as a piano major. I ended up graduating with two degrees from Manhattan School of Music. I was playing gigs on the weekend, doing whatever kind of jazz gigs I could find. During the day at school, my studies had to do with classical.

AAJ: You had quite a jazz background, your tenure in the Gerry Mulligan Quartet and also work with the wonderful valve trombonist and composer/arranger Bob Brookmeyer. How did they influence you?

TR: Yes, I think especially in regards to this jazz opera project, I think that both the people you mentioned were an influence. Bob Brookmeyer was the director of the BMI Jazz Composer's Workshop, which I was a member of and I guess you could say, a student of his. I got to record a wonderful duo album with him, One Night In Vermont. I had that relationship in terms of studying and talking about jazz composition and also got to play with him, initially through him sitting in on a couple of Gerry Mulligan gigs. Of course, Mulligan was also a wonderful composer and arranger and had a very detailed approach even to the quartet, as to how things were arranged and what he wanted to hear. Did he want to hear very spare or thick, lush piano? He was always thinking like an arranger, thinking about the group sound, whatever the group was, whether it was the quartet or a larger ensemble like the tentet, where we did Rebirth Of The Cool music on one of the tours. With Brookmeyer, additionally, the content of the Jazz Composer's Workshop had a lot to do with thinking about ways of expanding jazz composition, in terms of longer forms and other influences. For him specifically, some European influences were captivating him and he was imparting that to the students. That is certainly a direct influence on the Dear Erich opera, because you could say in many ways it encapsulates my approach, which is it is a jazz piece primarily but there are any number of European influences throughout the piece, especially when the action is taking place in Germany.

AAJ: Give me some background about the letters that inspired your jazz opera Dear Erich.

TR: The letters were in the house I grew up in. When my father passed away in 1995, we packed up the house and among the very few things that I took were this box of letters. He never really discussed them, I sort of knew the gist of it, that they were primarily from his mother, who perished like most of the other family members in the Holocaust. They were all in German and I was busy pursuing my music and other things in my life and did not really focus on what the content was because I could not read them. They went from sitting in a box in an attic in the house I grew up in to sitting in a box in the attic [laughs] of where I currently live. What started to pique my interest was about three years ago, we were invited to my grandmother's hometown in Germany, a very small town. The townspeople had refurbished a very small Jewish religious school in remembrance of the lost Jewish community. The people of the town invited the descendants of the Jews who had left. Almost on a lark, I said, "Let me take this box of letters out and maybe I will show them a few and see what they think and maybe they would translate a few." Members and heads of the historical society of this town, which is called Bad Camberg, said that ithe letters were of great interest to them, because this is the history of the town and they would be happy to translate the letters. I scanned about six over to them and they translated them. The revelations from the first six were just so amazing, because I knew almost nothing of the relatives who had perished. Just getting a small glimpse into this other life that was my family was really quite profound and I told them what an amazing experience this was for me and I mentioned that there were more letters and they were happy to translate all of the letters. I don't think at first [laughs] they realized there would be two hundred plus letters, but this man, Dr. Peter Schmidt, who is not only a wonderful, real life, heroic kind of person, but he really selflessly did all this, he is actually a character in the opera as well. He's coming to the premiere, by the way.

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